Chris Kunz

The Pronunciation of English as a Lingua Franca

The phenomenon of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) has sparked off considerable debate in the past few years. Considering ELF is used in contexts where speakers from both non-native English countries as well as mother tongue English countries, it is high time we looked a lot more closely into the linguistic and pragmatic features that are characteristic of this variety.

SESSION ABSTRACT

"The Pronunciation of English as a Lingua Franca

Shifting from EFL to ELF

The phenomenon of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) has sparked off considerable debate in the past few years. Considering ELF is used in contexts where speakers from both non-native English countries as well as mother tongue English countries, it is high time we looked much more closely into the linguistic and pragmatic features that are characteristic of this variety.

Alongside other linguistic areas, there are four that ELF concentrates on, which language users should utilise effectively if they want to sound intelligible, i.e.: most consonant sounds, appropriate consonant cluster simplification, vowel length distinctions and nuclear stress.

Of equal importance to linguistic features, especially when intelligibility may be put at risk, we must also mention those pragmatic strategies and meaning negotiation techniques used in most conversations.

Bearing in mind that English is now primarily being used among non-native speakers of English, we must, as English language teachers living in a globalised 21st century world, be particularly careful as to which pronunciation model we foster among our students.

One of the most common questions that a large number of English language teachers ask themselves is whether we should expose students to a wide(r) range of “non-native speaker” accents in the class. Research has shown us that in today’s fast-changing world, there are far more conversational exchanges between two non-native speakers than there are between one native and one non-native speaker.

If you are keen to find the answers to the questions above, then join Chris for this very interactive workshop and learn more about how the current status of English has undoubtedly influenced the way teachers should teach the language.

SPEAKER BIO

ELT Professional in Argentina, Australia and UK for over 25 years. Has vastly lectured in various countries on ELT Pedagogy, Advanced Language for teachers and English Phonetics and Phonology since 1997.

Has been involved with the Anglia ESOL Examinations Testing Services since 1996. Is the Anglia President within the Ibero-American Network. Holds the Cambridge/RSA Certificate and Diploma in ELTA. Is CELTA Trainer.

chris kunz.pdf